Archive for July, 2011

  • As many of you know, JETAA has worked hard to fundraise over $60,000 for the Japan Relief Efforts. We are looking for alumni (or Friends of JET) with accounting and legal backgrounds to call upon for advice on fundraising and taxes, particularly for nonprofits (JETAANY is a registered 501(c)3 organization). We also need someone with a technology background who can help make JETAANY’s member database a usable member-accessible interface on our website.  We are particularly looking for someone with experience in maintaining user privacy and security. If you or someone you know is interested, please contact Monica Yuki at president@jetaany.org. We look forward to hearing from you!<!-- AddThis Sharing Buttons below -->

    Attention JET Alums with Accounting, Legal and IT Experience- JETAANY Needs Your Help!

    As many of you know, JETAA has worked hard to fundraise over $60,000 for the Japan Relief Efforts. We are looking for alumni (or Friends of JET) with accounting and legal backgrounds to call upon for advice on fundraising and taxes, particularly for nonprofits (JETAANY is a registered 501(c)3 organization). We also need someone with a technology background who can help make JETAANY’s member database a usable member-accessible interface on our website.  We are particularly looking for someone with experience in maintaining user privacy and security. If you or someone you know is interested, please contact Monica Yuki at president@jetaany.org. We look forward to hearing from you!

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  • Do you wish you could go to JETAA events, but live outside of the NYC metropolitan area? Then help us bolster our subchapters! We currently have an active chapter in Pittsburgh, but we’re looking for JET alums in New Jersey, Philly and New York State to help organize events. If you are interested in becoming a representative, offering ideas, or even simply in hearing about events outside of NYC, let us know by emailing Pam Kavalam at secretary@jetaany.org.<!-- AddThis Sharing Buttons below -->

    Looking for New JETAANY Subchapter Reps (NJ, Philly, NY State)!

    Do you wish you could go to JETAA events, but live outside of the NYC metropolitan area? Then help us bolster our subchapters! We currently have an active chapter in Pittsburgh, but we’re looking for JET alums in New Jersey, Philly and New York State to help organize events. If you are interested in becoming a representative, offering ideas, or even simply in hearing about events outside of NYC, let us know by emailing Pam Kavalam at secretary@jetaany.org.

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  •   JQ magazine editor/Japanese Culture Examiner Justin Tedaldi (CIR Kobe-shi, 2001-02) was recently interviewed byFujisankei (FCI) News on Japan’s virtual pop idol Hatsune Miku for their “Today’s Eye” segment broadcast this week on Japanese TV! Miku is the star of Toyota’s summer Corolla ad campaign in the U.S., and earlier this month performed to massive crowds at L.A.’s Nokia Theatre and the San Diego Comic-Con! Check out the video here or click on the image for Justin’s comments.<!-- AddThis Sharing Buttons below -->

    Jul 20 JQ Magazine Editor Interviewed by FCI on Virtual Pop Idol Hatsune Miku

      JQ magazine editor/Japanese Culture Examiner Justin Tedaldi (CIR Kobe-shi, 2001-02) was recently interviewed byFujisankei (FCI) News on Japan’s virtual pop idol Hatsune Miku for their “Today’s Eye” segment broadcast this week on Japanese TV! Miku is the star of Toyota’s summer Corolla ad campaign in the U.S., and earlier this month performed to massive crowds at L.A.’s Nokia Theatre and the San Diego Comic-Con! Check out the video here or click on the image for Justin’s comments.

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  • By Justin Tedaldi (JETAANY) for NY Japanese Culture Examiner On Thursday (July 21), this year’s edition of the Lincoln Center Festival will present the U.S. theatrical premiere of director Amon Miyamoto’s The Temple of the Golden Pavilion, based on Kinkakuji, the celebrated 1956 novel byJapan’s storied 20th century writer Yukio Mishima. With a script co-written by Miyamoto and playwright Chihiro Ito, the play will run through July 24 at ColumbusCenter’s elegant RoseTheater.The Temple of the Golden Pavilion is a stunning tale of the power of beauty and its corruption of the mind of a young monk, Mizoguchi, who becomes obsessed with beauty’s destruction. This groundbreaking work paints an intensely personal picture ofJapan in the crucible of the Second World War. A native of Tokyoand the artistic director of the […]<!-- AddThis Sharing Buttons below -->

    Lincoln Center Festival premieres ‘Temple of the Golden Pavilion’

    By Justin Tedaldi (JETAANY) for NY Japanese Culture Examiner On Thursday (July 21), this year’s edition of the Lincoln Center Festival will present the U.S. theatrical premiere of director Amon Miyamoto’s The Temple of the Golden Pavilion, based on Kinkakuji, the celebrated 1956 novel byJapan’s storied 20th century writer Yukio Mishima. With a script co-written by Miyamoto and playwright Chihiro Ito, the play will run through July 24 at ColumbusCenter’s elegant RoseTheater.The Temple of the Golden Pavilion is a stunning tale of the power of beauty and its corruption of the mind of a young monk, Mizoguchi, who becomes obsessed with beauty’s destruction. This groundbreaking work paints an intensely personal picture ofJapan in the crucible of the Second World War. A native of Tokyoand the artistic director of the […]

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  • By Paul Benson (Fukui-ken, 2006-08) forJQ magazine. Paul is a New York-based freelance translator who has handled assignments ranging from securities law to cookbooks. This past week I had the pleasure of seeing two films in Japan Society’s annualJAPAN CUTS film festival. The festival runs from July 7-21, with 32 films (nearly all of them premieres). I was instantly drawn to JAPAN CUTS’ only two jidaigeki 時代劇 samurai films in the series, Sword of Desperation 「必死剣鳥刺し」 and The Last Ronin 「最後の忠臣蔵」. The films were wonderful, and I encourage you to seek them out. Sword of Desperation (2010, dir. Hideyuki Hirayama) is a poised and powerful film of feudal intrigues and expert swordsmen, a fine addition to the chanbara チャンバラ (“sword-fighting”) genre. Set in the Edo Period (1600-1868), Sword of Desperation has all the genre’s usual devices: […]<!-- AddThis Sharing Buttons below -->

    JQ Magazine: Film Review – ‘Sword of Desperation’ and ‘The Last Ronin’ at JAPAN CUTS 2011

    By Paul Benson (Fukui-ken, 2006-08) forJQ magazine. Paul is a New York-based freelance translator who has handled assignments ranging from securities law to cookbooks. This past week I had the pleasure of seeing two films in Japan Society’s annualJAPAN CUTS film festival. The festival runs from July 7-21, with 32 films (nearly all of them premieres). I was instantly drawn to JAPAN CUTS’ only two jidaigeki 時代劇 samurai films in the series, Sword of Desperation 「必死剣鳥刺し」 and The Last Ronin 「最後の忠臣蔵」. The films were wonderful, and I encourage you to seek them out. Sword of Desperation (2010, dir. Hideyuki Hirayama) is a poised and powerful film of feudal intrigues and expert swordsmen, a fine addition to the chanbara チャンバラ (“sword-fighting”) genre. Set in the Edo Period (1600-1868), Sword of Desperation has all the genre’s usual devices: […]

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  • When: Wednesday, August 31st,  7:00 pm – 9:00 pm Where: The Flatiron Building, 175 5th Avenue Cost: $2-3 for food RSVP/Questions: Email jetaanybookclub@gmail.com or sign up on Facebook. More Info:   My Year of Meats by Ruth Ozeki  From Wikipedia: Jane Takagi-Little is a Japanese American journalist who is hired to work for a Japanese production company. The company works with Beef-Ex to promote the use of American beef in Japan by creating a Japanese television show called “My American Wife”. Jane works as the host and creative producer and every week an American wife is shown living “her life” and cooking meat. The novel goes on to show just how manipulative the production company and meat industry are. Parallel to […]<!-- AddThis Sharing Buttons below -->

    (8/31) JETAANY Book Club: My Year of Meats by Ruth Ozeki

    When: Wednesday, August 31st,  7:00 pm – 9:00 pm Where: The Flatiron Building, 175 5th Avenue Cost: $2-3 for food RSVP/Questions: Email jetaanybookclub@gmail.com or sign up on Facebook. More Info:   My Year of Meats by Ruth Ozeki  From Wikipedia: Jane Takagi-Little is a Japanese American journalist who is hired to work for a Japanese production company. The company works with Beef-Ex to promote the use of American beef in Japan by creating a Japanese television show called “My American Wife”. Jane works as the host and creative producer and every week an American wife is shown living “her life” and cooking meat. The novel goes on to show just how manipulative the production company and meat industry are. Parallel to […]

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  • When: Saturday, August 20th from 3:00 pm – 4:00 pm Where: TENRI CULTURAL INSTITUTE (43A West 13th St, New York, NY 10011) Cost: $20. Make sure to reserve your space on Paypal HERE. Application deadline: August 17th (Minimum participation is 10, and maximum is 30.) Gagaku, “elegant music,” was brought into Japan from the T’ang Dynasty Court in China and other Southeast Asia countriesduring the 8th century. In Japan, the music was refined and developed over many centuries, and passed down within hereditary families. Today, this music is still part of the ceremonies of the royal family and state shrines. We will listen to the beautiful harmony, learn the instruments, and experience playing the sound of the music through the […]<!-- AddThis Sharing Buttons below -->

    Listen, Learn, and Experience GAGAKU!

    When: Saturday, August 20th from 3:00 pm – 4:00 pm Where: TENRI CULTURAL INSTITUTE (43A West 13th St, New York, NY 10011) Cost: $20. Make sure to reserve your space on Paypal HERE. Application deadline: August 17th (Minimum participation is 10, and maximum is 30.) Gagaku, “elegant music,” was brought into Japan from the T’ang Dynasty Court in China and other Southeast Asia countriesduring the 8th century. In Japan, the music was refined and developed over many centuries, and passed down within hereditary families. Today, this music is still part of the ceremonies of the royal family and state shrines. We will listen to the beautiful harmony, learn the instruments, and experience playing the sound of the music through the […]

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  • The devastation of the March 11, 2011 (3/11) earthquake and tsunami in northeasternJapantriggered overwhelming support from theUS, with over $300 million raised for disaster relief. Now that the humanitarian aid is underway, what has happened in terms of recovery and rebuilding the disaster afflicted areas? What is the current status of the Japanese disaster areas? What are the needs for mid and long-term reconstruction? How isJapan’s civil society collaborating with the international community in the recovery process? These critical questions will be addressed in a panel discussion hosted by the Asia Society and co-presented with theJapanFoundationCenterfor Global Partnership (CGP) and theJapanCenterfor International Exchange (JCIE). The event will feature speakers from key Japanese civil society organizations working on restoration efforts. Key […]<!-- AddThis Sharing Buttons below -->

    Voices from the Ground: the latest Report from the Japanese Civil Society’s Response to the 3/11 Disaster

    The devastation of the March 11, 2011 (3/11) earthquake and tsunami in northeasternJapantriggered overwhelming support from theUS, with over $300 million raised for disaster relief. Now that the humanitarian aid is underway, what has happened in terms of recovery and rebuilding the disaster afflicted areas? What is the current status of the Japanese disaster areas? What are the needs for mid and long-term reconstruction? How isJapan’s civil society collaborating with the international community in the recovery process? These critical questions will be addressed in a panel discussion hosted by the Asia Society and co-presented with theJapanFoundationCenterfor Global Partnership (CGP) and theJapanCenterfor International Exchange (JCIE). The event will feature speakers from key Japanese civil society organizations working on restoration efforts. Key […]

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  • Seeking summer movie asylum from Autobots and aging boy wizards? Head to Japan Society. Now in its fifth consecutive year, the JAPAN CUTS 2011 film festival includes 32 new titles—the biggest lineup in the festival’s history with (almost) nothing but premieres and one-off shows—running from July 7 to 22, including ten co-presentations with the New York Asian Film Festival (NYAFF). “Arguably North America’s premier showcase for Japanese film” (Firefox News), JAPAN CUTS screens the cutting edge of contemporary Japanese fare, caroming between elegant drama to anything-goes comedy to uncanny experimentalism. All films—most of themNew Yorkpremieres–are primarily shown in Japanese with English subtitles, some with actor/director intros and Q&As and after parties. This week’s cuts are: Thursday, July 7 Osamu Tezuka’s Buddha: The Great Departure, 6:45 […]<!-- AddThis Sharing Buttons below -->

    Japan Society’s first week of JAPAN CUTS 2011 offers ‘Buddha,’ ‘Battle Royale’

    Seeking summer movie asylum from Autobots and aging boy wizards? Head to Japan Society. Now in its fifth consecutive year, the JAPAN CUTS 2011 film festival includes 32 new titles—the biggest lineup in the festival’s history with (almost) nothing but premieres and one-off shows—running from July 7 to 22, including ten co-presentations with the New York Asian Film Festival (NYAFF). “Arguably North America’s premier showcase for Japanese film” (Firefox News), JAPAN CUTS screens the cutting edge of contemporary Japanese fare, caroming between elegant drama to anything-goes comedy to uncanny experimentalism. All films—most of themNew Yorkpremieres–are primarily shown in Japanese with English subtitles, some with actor/director intros and Q&As and after parties. This week’s cuts are: Thursday, July 7 Osamu Tezuka’s Buddha: The Great Departure, 6:45 […]

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  • By Ashley Thompson (Shizuoka-ken, 2008-2010) for JQ magazine. Ashley is the founder of Surviving in Japan (Without Much Japanese) and Lifelines columnist for the Japan Times. Six years ago,Japanwas nowhere on my radar. If someone had told me then thatJapanwould become my second home, I would have laughed.Japanwas foreign, unknown, and I had no interest in it other than its traditional art and history. Plus, I was a homebody—living overseas became a potential option only a few years ago. After graduating high school in the town I spent most of my life, I moved two hours away (via car) toSeattlefor school and work. During that time I met David—a senior at the university I attended for a year while volunteering—who became one of my closest friends. I came to learn […]<!-- AddThis Sharing Buttons below -->

    JQ Magazine: JET Alum Ashley Thompson’s ‘Surviving in Japan’

    By Ashley Thompson (Shizuoka-ken, 2008-2010) for JQ magazine. Ashley is the founder of Surviving in Japan (Without Much Japanese) and Lifelines columnist for the Japan Times. Six years ago,Japanwas nowhere on my radar. If someone had told me then thatJapanwould become my second home, I would have laughed.Japanwas foreign, unknown, and I had no interest in it other than its traditional art and history. Plus, I was a homebody—living overseas became a potential option only a few years ago. After graduating high school in the town I spent most of my life, I moved two hours away (via car) toSeattlefor school and work. During that time I met David—a senior at the university I attended for a year while volunteering—who became one of my closest friends. I came to learn […]

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  • Let’s learn and play SHOGI, Japanese chess When: Saturday, July 16th from 1:00 pm – 3:00 pm Where: Onya Restaurant, Second Floor (143 East 47th Street, New York, NY 10017) Cost: $20 Application deadline: July 13th, 2011 (Minimum participation is 4, and maximum is 20.) Shogi has been a traditional Japanese game since 8th century. It is quite similar to chess, but the difference is that a player can reuse captured pieces as his or her own. Characters indicating rank and role, such as king or shogun, are written on the pieces. They are made of wood carved in an irregular pentagonal shape. Two opponents move their pieces on a board of 81 squares. Each player has 20 pieces. They move […]<!-- AddThis Sharing Buttons below -->

    Let’s learn and play SHOGI, Japanese chess

    Let’s learn and play SHOGI, Japanese chess When: Saturday, July 16th from 1:00 pm – 3:00 pm Where: Onya Restaurant, Second Floor (143 East 47th Street, New York, NY 10017) Cost: $20 Application deadline: July 13th, 2011 (Minimum participation is 4, and maximum is 20.) Shogi has been a traditional Japanese game since 8th century. It is quite similar to chess, but the difference is that a player can reuse captured pieces as his or her own. Characters indicating rank and role, such as king or shogun, are written on the pieces. They are made of wood carved in an irregular pentagonal shape. Two opponents move their pieces on a board of 81 squares. Each player has 20 pieces. They move […]

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